AIDS-Related Diseases
Providing expertise and resources to better understand, prevent and treat HIV and AIDS.
Nonhuman Primate Systems Biology
Using systems biology and computational modeling to understand infection and immunology.
Global Programs
Focusing on conservation biology, field study training and emerging infectious diseases.
Neuroscience
Using the primate model to answer questions about the nervous system, vision and more.
Reproductive & Developmental Sciences
Exploring reproductive biology, stem cell research and cognitive development.
Evolutionary Emergence of Infectious Diseases
Understanding how interspecies interaction leads to the emergence of disease.
Venture/Pilot Program
Providing specialized facilities, expertise and support to investigators with approved projects.

Division of Global Programs

In light of the diminishing primate resource options both nationally and abroad, the global significance of establishing and maintaining scientific international collaborations with multiple habitat/source countries cannot be overstated. In addition to the mutual benefits derived through joint research and training, foreign breeding programs, supported through international collaboration, provide immediate and long-term priority resource support to address the human health concerns of both countries. The priority of access afforded via a formal collaborative program is an important consideration and something that may not be assured through reliance solely on commercial suppliers.

The Division of Global Programs has established collaborative programs in Indonesia, Nepal, Russia, China, Bangladesh, Thailand, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Mexico. These collaborative international programs support our Center as well as the other 7 NIH-supported National Primate Research Centers and affiliate researchers.

The Division also encompasses a broad range of scientific and service-oriented programs including collaborative research, training/outreach, and conservation. The Primate Resource Referral Service (PRRS) provides the communications/database network needed for efficient acquisition and sharing of existing captive primates and primate-related resources by investigators and institutions both nationally and internationally. The overall goal of this service is to maximize the use of existing captive primates, thereby reducing the total number of primates needed for research, and in turn, helping to promote the conservation of primate populations in the wild.

The Division’s research focus includes the primary core of Conservation Biology. The focus of the Conservation Biology research is on the natural biology and assessment of naturally occurring primate populations.

Dr. Kyes has been instrumental in establishing collaborative field-based training programs in Primatology and Conservation Biology for students, staff and professionals affiliated with our foreign institutions.

Core Staff Scientists

Name
WaNPRC Division
Position
UW Department(s)
Randall C. Kyes
Global ProgramsCore Staff ScientistDepartment of Psychology